Information

Gloster Meteor NF.14


Gloster Meteor NF.14

The Gloster Meteor NF Mk.14 was the final night fighter version of the Meteor, featuring an improved clear-vision sliding canopy and slightly more powerful engines than the earlier NF Mk.12. The NF Mk.14 also featured an auto-stabiliser, which much improved its stability at high altitude and was the first night fighter variant to carry ejector seats.

There is some disagreement over the length of the NF Mk.14. Some sources suggest that it was longer than the earlier night fighters, with a longer radome designed to carry an improved radar set that was eventually not installed, while other sources report the Mk.14 to have been the same length as the Mk.12. This author has examined photographic evidence, which suggests that the two marks were indeed the same length (assuming that each photograph did indeed represent the mark allocated to it).

The first of the 100 production NF Mk.14 flew on 23 October 1953 with deliveries beginning on 6 November. The last of those aircraft was completed in May 1955, and was the last Meteor to leave the production line.

The NF.14 entered service with No.25 Squadron, in March 1954, and became the standard night fighter until the eventual arrival of the Gloster Javelin, the long delayed dedicated jet night fighter. The NF.14 was a popular aircraft, which gained the nickname “Queen of the Skies”, although by the mid-1950s it was becoming obsolescent – aircraft such as the English Electric Canberra bomber could out-perform it at altitude, causing problems during RAF exercises.

The Meteor NF Mk.14 began to be replaced by the Javelin during 1957, with the last UK-based squadron changing over during 1959. The last RAF frontline operator of the type would be No.60 Squadron, which was equipped with the Meteor from October 1959-September 1961 at Tengah, Singapore, where it provided night cover for British forces engaged in the Malayan Emergency.

From June 1959 until 1965 a number of NF Mk.14s served as training aircraft, first with No.2 Air Navigation School and then with No.1 Air Navigation School. These aircraft had their armament and radar removed, and the radar replaced by a UHF radio set.

Engine: Two Rolls-Royce Derwent 9 engines
Thrust: 3,800lb/ 16.9kN each
Span: 43ft
Length: 49.9ft or 49.9ft
Gross Weight: 17,287lb
Maximum level speed at 10,000ft: 585mph
Rate of climb at sea level: 5,800ft/min
Ceiling: 43,000ft
Cruise Range at normal load: 875 miles
Armament: Four 20mm cannon in wings
Crew: Two


Gloster Meteor NF.14 - History

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November 2019 : Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 47 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 01: Meteor NF.14 WS726/H, No. 25 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 02: Meteor NF.14 WS729/A, No. 25 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 03: Meteor NF.14s of 85 Squadron taxiing with WS734/H in the rear

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 04: Meteor NF.14 WS735/A, No. 152 Squadron (derelick)

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 05: Meteor NF.14 WS740, No. 85 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 06: Meteor NF.14 WS743/M, No. 85 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 07: Meteor NF.14 WS744/A, 1 ANS

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 08: see above

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 09: Meteor NF.14 WS745/J, AWDS

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 10: Meteor NF.14 WS750/W, No. 25 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 11: Meteor NF.14 WS754/D, No. 60 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 12: Meteor NF.14 WS759/B, No. 60 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 13: Meteor NF.14 WS759/Y, No. 33 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 14: Meteor NF.14 WS760/P, 1 ANS

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 15: Meteor NF.14 WS774/D, 1 ANS

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 16: Meteor NF.14 WS774

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 17: Meteor NF.14 WS775, No. 85 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 18: See above

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 19: Meteor NF.14 WS777, No. 85 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 20: Meteor NF.14s of No. 85 Squadron flying in formation

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 21: Meteor NF.14 WS787/G, No. 60 Squadron (gate guard)

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 22: Meteor NF.14 WS790/H, No. 33 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 23: Meteor NF.14 WS791/B, No. 33 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 24: Meteor NF.14 WS794/K, No. 60 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 25: Meteor NF.14 WS800/V, No. 60 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 26: Meteor NF.14 WS807/J, 1 ANS

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 27: Meteor NF.14 WS809/E, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 28: Meteor NF.14 WS810/B, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 29: Meteor NF.14 WS828/C, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 30: Meteor NF.14 WS832/N, AWOCU

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 31: Meteor NF.14 WS831/X, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 32: Meteor NF.14 WS833/MS, No. 72 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 33: Meteor NF.14 WS836/P, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 34: See above

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 35: Meteor NF.14 WS837/S, No. 72 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 36: Meteor NF.14 WS841/HMT, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 37: See above

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 38: See above

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 39: Meteor NF.14 WS844/JCF, No. 264 Squadron

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 40: Meteor NF.14 WS848/F, CFE

Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 41: Meteor NF.14 WS848, FCCS

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 101: Meteor NF.14 NF14-747

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 102: Meteor NF.14 NF14-747/BM

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 103: See photo 101

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 104: Meteor NF.14 NF14-747

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 105: Meteor NF.14 NF14-747

French Gloster Meteor NF.14 – 106: Meteor NF.14 NF14-747 (see photo 102 for opposite side)


Gloster Meteor NF.14 - History

If you are looking for photos of a specific aircraft type, use this menu.
Please note that, due to space constraints, this menu includes only some of the more requested aircraft in our database. If the aircraft you're searching for is not in this list, use the 'Keywords' field further down in the search menus.

Some menu selections include a generic aircraft model, as well as more specific variants of that airliner. These variants are denoted by a - before the aircraft name.

Selecting 'Boeing 747,' for example, will show results featuring all Boeing 747 jetliners in our database, while selecting '- Boeing 747-200' will show all Boeing 747-200 variants in our database (Boeing 747-200, Boeing 747-212B, Boeing 747-283F, etc.)

If you are looking for photos of a specific airline, use this menu.

Please note that, due to space constraints, this menu includes only airlines of which 10 or more photos exist in our database. If the airline you're searching for is not in this list, use the 'Keywords' field further down in the search menu.

Airlines are listed in alphabetical order.

If you are looking for photos taken in a specific country, or at a specific airport, use this menu.

All countries represented in our database are included in this selection menu, which is updated automatically as the database grows. There must be at least 20 photos from a specific airport in the database before that airport is added to this list.

Use this option to include only photos taken by a specific photographer in your search.

This pulldown menu, in addition to each photographer available as a search limiter, also shows the number of photos currently in the database for each specific photographer, enclosed in brackets. For example, an option of:
- Paul Jones [550]
.. indicates that there are 550 total photos taken by Paul Jones currently in the database.

Note: The total number of photos, enclosed in brackets, is updated four (4) times hourly, and may be slightly inaccurate.

Photographers must have 100 or more photos in the database before their name is included in this selection menu..
The 'All Photographers' selection is the default selection for this option.

If you are looking for a specific category of photo, use this menu.

You may select to display only photos from certain categories, such as Special Paintschemes, Flight Deck photos, etc. New categories are constantly being added to this list.

The 'Keywords' field is perhaps the most useful field included in our search engine.
Using this field, you may search for any word, term, or combinations of terms in our database.
Every photo field is covered by the Keywords search routine.

The Keywords field is ideal for searching for such specifics as aircraft registrations, photographers' names, specific airport/city names, specific paintschemes (i.e. 'Wunala Dreaming'), etc.
To use the Keywords field, begin by selecting a Keyworld search field. You may select either a specific database field (airline, aircraft, etc.), or choose to match your keyword to all database fields.

Next, select a Keyword limiter. There are three options from which to choose:
- is exactly
- starts with
- contains
Select the appropriate limiter for your search, then enter the keyword(s) you wish to search in the box on the right.

The Keywords search field is not case-sensitive.

Use this option to include only photos taken in a specific year in your search.

This pulldown menu, in addition to each year available as a search limiter, also shows the number of photos currently in the database for each specific year, enclosed in brackets. For example, an option of:
- 2003 [55000]
.. indicates that there are 55,000 total photos taken in the year 2003 currently in the database.
*Note: The total number of photos, enclosed in brackets, is updated four (4) times hourly, and may be slightly inaccurate.

Additionally, decade ranges (1990-1999, etc.) are available as selections in this menu. Selecting a decade range will show all photos matching your other search criteria from the selected decade.
The 'All Years' selection is the default selection for this option.


- The Airfix Tribute Forum -

Aug 27, 2013 #46 2013-08-27T18:57

"We're going to need a bigger boat"

Aug 28, 2013 #47 2013-08-28T07:17

Aug 28, 2013 #48 2013-08-28T08:18

Aug 28, 2013 #49 2013-08-28T19:59

Aug 28, 2013 #50 2013-08-28T23:33

Getting back to my youth, using my youngest as an excuse.

Sep 04, 2013 #51 2013-09-04T14:37

Current build/carpet monster fodder: 1/72 DO217 Nachtjager, Canberra PR.9, Corsair II, 1/24 Harrier GR3. Think that's all for now.

And as for the full size aircraft project- http://victorxl231.blogspot.com/

Sep 04, 2013 #52 2013-09-04T14:56

Apr 03, 2017 #53 2017-04-03T14:37

I've just finished an unusual Meteor, utilising the Matchbox NF.11/12/14 kit. Mine being a conversion to a Meteor T.7 trainer, based on a photo that can be found on the 'Aviation Forum', here http://forum.keypublishing.com/showthre . 833-SE-CAS (scroll down just over half-way on the page)







This is Meteor T.7 WH225, N, of 607 Squadron at RAF Ouston circa 1953. It was a Vampire unit, but had two Meteor T.7s for instrument training, etc. My initial reaction on seeing the black and white photo, was that the aircraft had PRU blue undersides, but a contemporary report from the 1950's says that 607's Meteors were camouflaged 'in service', to match their Vampires. I also initially thought that the photo shows Meteor T.7 VW439 'R'. So it just didn't make sense that the Meteor would have been re-painted 'in service' with blue undersides. So I tried to convince myself that the photo shows silver undersides, or even a night-fighter scheme with medium grey undersides. However, on digitally enhancing the photo, it became apparent that the Meteor is in fact coded 'N', which makes it WH225. A quick check on the history of WH225 reveals previous service with the 2nd TAF in Germany. Bingo! It wasn't repainted in 607 Sqdn service, but rather retained its former 2 TAF scheme which on their fighters at that time was ocean grey & dark green over PRU blue. Camouflage on Meteor T.7s is as rare as hen's teeth, and the few known examples have silver undersides. So Meteor T.7 WH225 in 607 Sqdn markings is exceptionally rare with PRU blue under. It also has a non-standard camouflage pattern on top, and with only one quarter of this pattern visible in the photo, the rest I had to interpret and reproduce with some resemblance to the standard Gloster fighter scheme.

The conversion of the Matchbox Meteor started off well enough, with an Airfix F.3 nose, and tail unit added. I didn't worry about getting the length exactly right, but rather went for 'best fit' of the parts and glued them accordingly. Strange then, on comparing with scale drawings, that my overall length is spot-on! So something isn't accurate with the basic Matchbox fuselage. However, the conversion became increasingly difficult thereafter, with modifications required to windscreen, canopy, cockpit interior, deleting wing guns & associated vents and chutes, and moving the ailerons inboard - I chose to completely cut them off the Matchbox wing, including a section of wing in the new aileron. I also completely cut-off the wingtips and fashioned replacement tips, rather than just file the Matchbox ones to the new shape. A further fiddly problem with the Matchbox kit is the absence of the rods that hold all the wheel mudguards in place, and the mainwheel hubs themselves require the holes filling in on their port sides.

I regret not fully modifying the canopy - the Meteor T.7 does not have three external frames on top of the canopy - rather only one, with the other two being internal. I may still correct this once the paint has fully hardened and I can handle the model. And then came the painting - three disasters on one kit! First the rattle-can primer wouldn't dry, so eventually I sealed it with hand-painted acrylic light grey. Then I used azure blue for the undersides (idiot!) and had to over paint it with PRU blue. Finally (trying to make up time) I didn't pre-varnish the new blue, and the transfers silvered. So I scraped them off and started again. This kit now has no less than 13 coats on it in some areas! I still haven't decided whether to retain the rather attractive gloss finish (correct) or tone it down a bit with a 14th coat (of varnish). If you are thinking of attempting this project, the good news is that the Xtradecal Meteor T.7 sheet includes the required markings, which are the same as used on their VW439 'R', plus one of their other serial options is WH224, which takes little effort to turn in to WH225. Thanks for looking, and my apologies for the rather long diatribe on this occasion.


Gloster Meteor NF.14 - History

THE JET AGE RESERVE MODEL COLLECTION

A MODEL HISTORY OF GLOSTER AIRCRAFT

Here, then, are those photographs of individual models along with some historical background on each exhibit.

THE BIPLANE ERA

Kit by Aeroclub, assembled by Tony Neuls

First flown in February 1925, the Gloster Gamecock was a development of the 1923 vintage Gloster Grebe biplane fighter, powered by the Armstrong-Siddeley Jaguar engine. The Gamecock’s Bristol Jupiter radial prime mover proved more reliable although aerodynamic faults inherited from the Grebe were to cause 8 fatal crashes in the Gamecock’s first 19 months of RAF service. Despite this the Gamecock was a fine aerobatic aircraft and only retired from RAF service in July 1931. One of the five RAF squadrons to fly the Gloster Gamecock was Number 43, ever since known as "The Fighting Cocks."

Gloster Gamecocks were also licence built in Finland as the Kukko and were followed from the Gloster factory at Hucclecote by such biplane fighters as the Gauntlet and Gladiator

Corgi limited edition die cast model, the first in the World with full rigging.

Developed from the earlier Gloster Gauntlet, the Gloster Gladiator was both the last biplane fighter used by the RAF and also the first with a fully enclosed cockpit. First flown as the Gloster SS37 in September 1934, the Gladiator also featured cantilever landing gear and a two bladed fixed pitch propeller while the navalized Sea Gladiator also had catapult points, arrester hook and was fitted with a collapsible dinghy.

Export customers included Belgium, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Norway, China, Ireland, Greece, Portugal, Egypt, Iraq and South Africa.

72 Squadron RAF was the first to equip with the type at Tangmere in February 1937. By September 1939, Gloster Gladiators were widely spread across the Mediterranean and Middle East and this example – Sea Gladiator N5531 – has a special story to tell.

At the start of World War II total air power on the strategic British-held island of Malta consisted of four Gloster Gladiators. These were packed in crates and left at Kalafrana flying boat base on the island by the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious that left to join the Norwegian campaign. In fact there were enough parts to make up eight biplanes but the Royal Navy wanted four back to join the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle. The remaining four were assembled. Three were to be used operationally with one kept in reserve. Flying Officer John Waters named the operational Gladiators "Faith" , "Hope" and "Charity".

Their first scramble came at 0649 on 11 June 1940 when 10 Italian Savoia Marchetti 79 bombers attacked Malta’s Grand Harbour, although on the seventh Fascist raid of that day a Gladiator was able to shoot down a Macchi 200 fighter – the slower biplanes being more manoeuvrable than their foes. Three bladed propellers rather than the standard two bladed components were fitted to improve the rate of climb although excessive use of superchargers to rapidly gain altitude led to blown pistons on the Bristol Mercury radial engines. As a result, the three Gladiators were fitted with similar powerplants from Bristol Blenheim bombers and fought on for 17 days without relief, fooling Italian intelligence into thinking that Malta had a substantial air defence force. Sea Gladiator N5531 had been assigned to 802 Naval Air Squadron from June 1939 to January 1940 and was named "Hope" as part of the Hal Far Flight on 19 April 1940. She was destroyed in an air raid on 4 February 1941.

THE MONOPLANE ERA

Injection moulded kit from Jet Age Reserve Model Collection

The first Gloster-built Hawker Hurricane appeared on 27 October 1939 and the 1 000 th example exactly a year later. A total of 2 750 Hurricanes were built by Glosters up to March 1942: with as many as five aircraft being completed each day. These Rolls Royce Merlin powered monoplanes fought in both the Battle of Britain and the earlier Battle of France. The example here combines brown and green camouflage – ideally suited for combat over land – with the half-black half-white underside paint scheme used by the RAF early in World War Two. This underside livery can also be seen on Gloster Sea Gladiators "Hope" and N5641.

Designed by Sydney Camm, the Hawker Hurricane was the World’s first eight-gun monoplane fighter capable of surpassing 300 mph in level flight with a full war load. The first prototype flew on 6 November 1935 and production examples began to equip 111 Squadron in January 1938. More Hawker Hurricanes were used in the Battle of Britain than any other RAF fighter type and their pilots claimed 75 % of all victories. The Hawker Hurricane continued in use until the end of World War II and its rugged design lent itself to the ground attack role with rockets, bombs and even 40mm tank-busting canon.

Corgi limited edition die cast model

The Napier Sabre-engined Hawker Typhoon first flew in February 1940 although delivery to the RAF did not begin until September 1941 and engine and structural problems dogged the Typhoons early career as a low-level interceptor. However, from 1942, the Hawker Typhoon excelled in its role as a ground attack strike aircraft, fitted with four 20mm Hispano canon and either 1 000lb of bombs or eight rocket projectiles.

Toward the end of May 1943, 219 Group Royal Air Force sent three Hawker Typhoons for operational flight trials in the Middle East, lodging them with 451 Squadon Royal Australian Air Force based at Landing Ground 106 of RAF Station Idku, Egypt. Commanded by Squadron Leader J. Paine, 451 had recently been withdrawn from front line operations and their experience with Hawker Hurricane Mk IIcs in the Western Desert made its pilots ideal to evaluate its proposed successor. In addition, 451 Squadron also contained a flight of three Mark V Supermarine Spitfires - on loan from 103 Maintenance Unit - used on "Marker" duties to intercept high flying German reconnaissance aircraft over nearby Alexandria.

On 14 June 1943 Hawker Typhoon R8891 arrived at Idku but by 17 June its engine had attained 30 hours and was unserviceable as the representative of Napier Engines - needed to perform a sleeve valve wear check - had not yet arrived. It was then replaced by DN323, as depicted in the Corgi model, and the trials continued, culminating in armament tests in September 1943. The three Hawker Typhoons were then ferried to 161 Maintenance Unit on 23 October 1943.

The example above, modelled by Tony Neuls from the Airfix kit, is painted in late War markings with black and white D-Day invasion stripes under its rear fuselage and a three bladed propeller in contrast to the two bladed propeller seen on the Hurricane.

In particular, Typhoons helped end the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944 when they were able to halt the advance of German armour through the Ardennes. The Hawker Typhoon also provided the basis for the later Hawker Tempest and Sea Fury piston-engined fighters and most of the 3 330 examples were built in Gloucester.

Tony Neuls was also kind enough to lend to the exhibition his Airfix model of the classic RAF David Brown tractor . As many 1/72 scale enthusiasts will know, this tractor was only ever available on the same sprue as the Airfix Short Stirling bomber and was included to pull the bomb trolleys also included in the kit. However, not only was the RAF David Brown tractor a common sight on most British airfields in the Second World War but Stirlings - the first RAF four engined heavy bombers - were also produced on the Gloster site at Hucclecote after Shorts own factory at Rochester had been bombed in 1940.

THE EARLY JET ERA

In fact the first ever jet-propelled aeroplane to fly was the Heinkel 178 at Marienehe, Germany, on 27 August 1939. This was powered by a 1 100 lb thrust Heinkel HeS3B gas turbine designed by Dr Hans Pabst von Ohain and based on Whittle’s initial work. However, as the German government at the time felt that its conventional piston aircraft were sufficient for its current needs, Heinkel’s jet programme was not greatly encouraged.

Kit by Frog / Novo from the Jet Age Reserve Model Collection. Although for many years the only plastic kit of the E28/39 available - and still capturing the essential layout of the aircraft – this original Frog moulding is not dimensionally accurate.

Supported by the British Government, Power Jet's experimental BTH turbine evolved into the 860 lb thrust W1 power plant which drove the Gloster –Whittle E28/39 into the air during its initial flights at Hucclecote on 8 April 1941 and then during its official first flight at Cranwell on 15 May 1941. A second E28/39 flew in March 1943 but crashed during the following July. The first example however continued to test ever more powerful jet engines until being retired from flight in 1943.

Vacuumed-formed Maintrack kit assembled by Tony Neuls.

The Gloster E 1/44 was designed around a single gas turbine as an insurance against the possible failure of the twin Derwent-engined Gloster Meteor project. However, despite the success of the Meteor, Gloster continued with their single engined jet fighter concept and began building an airframe round the 5 000 lb horsepower Rolls Royce Nene gas turbine in 1944.

Construction of the first prototype – SM809 – was complete in July 1947 only for the aircraft to be irreparably damaged in a road accident as it was being taken by lorry for its first flight at Boscombe Down. SM809 was replaced by second prototype TX145 which first flew at Boscombe Down’s Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment on 9 March 1948.

Although this reached a speed of 620 mph and climbed well, overall handling problems led to the third machine – TX148, seen here – being fitted with a tailplane halfway up the fin rather than at the fin base. This arrangement was similar to the tail structure of Meteors from the F8 variant onward but as the E 1/44 was seen as having limited development potential compared to the established De Havilland Vampire the project was abandoned.

However, both TX145 and TX148 earned their keep at RAE Farnborough developing runway braking parachutes and flying control systems into the 1950s.

THE TWIN JET ERA

Airfix kit assembled by Tony Neuls

The Gloster Meteor was not only the first jet aircraft to go into RAF squadron service but alsothe only Allied jet aircraft to se active service during World War II.

Design work began in 1940 and the prototype twin-jet Gloster F9/40 first flew on 5 March 1943 with the first Meteor F1 taking to the air on 12 January 1944. The first RAF Meteor Squadron – 616 – started conversion from Spitfire VIIs on 12 July 1944 and Flying Officer Dean made the first jet-to-jet kill on 4 August 1944 when he flipped over a V1 flying bomb with the wingtip of EE216 .

On 18 December 1944 616 Squadron began to re-equip with Meteor F3s, powered by 2 000 lb thrust Derwent I engines and also featuring sliding rather than hinged canopies, increased internal fuel capacity, slotted air brakes and a strengthened airframe. Meteor F3s went on to equip RAF Fighter Command’s first all-jet Wing and also the first Auxilliary Air Force jet squadron. Gloster Meteors were also used in early flight refuelling trials and deck landing trials aboard HMS Implacable.

The figures and accumulator trolleys seen with the turbojet powered Meteors are from the Airfix RAF Ground Crew set and have been loaned by the Jet Age Reserve Model Collection.

Adapted from Airfix Meteor F3 kit by Tony Neuls.

EE227, the 18 th production Meteor F1, went to the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough after completing 80 hours of operational flying and was used for directional stability trials, during which it flew with the top fin and rudder removed.

In February 1945 it reverted to Meteor F1 standard and went to Rolls Royce at Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, for the installation of the RB 50 Trent propeller turbines fitted with 7’ 11" diameter Rotol propellers. Vertical fences on the tailplane were reminiscent of those seen on some configuarations of the E28/39.

EE227's first Trent powered flight, with Eric Greenwood at the controls, took place at Church Broughton on 20 September 1945. This was the World’s first flight by a propeller-turbine aircraft and EE227 is thus the ancestor of all the turboprop military and civil aircraft flying today. Click on the picture above for more on turboprop aircraft fitted with Gloucestershire made propellers


The Gloster Meteor F3 had been first operational jet fighter used by the Royal Air Force, and the Gloster Meteor F4 was distinguished from it by a shorter wingspan and longer engine nacelles. The shorter wingspan – 37’ 2" against the original 43’ – was stiffer, and being 6% smaller offered a rate of roll of more than 80 degrees per second. However, the Meteor F4 required higher take off and landing speeds as a result. The more aerodynamic long chord nacelles meanwhile could accept the 3 000 lb thrust Derwent 5 engine, adapted by Rolls Royce from the even larger and more powerful Nene turbojet. Meteor F4s also featured a strengthened airframe and a pressurised cockpit and could reach over 600 mph at sea level and Mach 0.85 at 30,000 ft, an altitude that could be reached in just 6 minutes.

The Gloster Meteor F4's attributes of speed and rapid ascent are particularly well displayed in this mock interception of two and four piston engined aircraft. During the closing days of World War II in Europe, Gloster Meteors exercised with American bomber aircraft to give their crews experience of repelling jet fighters - swept wing Messerschmidt 262s in the case of actual bombing raids. Meteors were more than capable of dealing with the first generation of Soviet strategic bombers - the Tupolev Tu-4 "Bull" for example being a back-engineered copy of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress. However, two-seat Meteor night fighters and then Gloster Javelins - along with Hawker Hunters and English Electric Lightnings - were required later in the 1950s as a deterrent to later Soviet designs such as the Tu-95 "Bear" and M-4 "Bison" .

The F4 was also the last fighter version of the Gloster Meteor to be fitted with the original curved tailplane. Single seat Gloster Meteors from the F8 onward had a more rectangular and more streamlined tail.

Corgi limited edition die cast model

First flown on 12 October 1948, the long nacelled F8 was the ultimate day fighter version of the Gloster Meteor and was only replaced in 19 front line RAF Fighter Command squadrons by the Hawker Hunter in 1955.

Between 1951 and 1953 however, the Meteor F8 also became the only British built jet aircraft to serve with the United Nations forces in Korea: equipping 77 Squadron Royal Australian Air Force based at Kimpo, South Korea.

On 27 March 1953 Flight Sergeant George Hale and Flight Sergeant David Irlam were part of a flight of four Meteor F8s - led by Squadron Leader John Hubble - attacking ground traffic between Pyongyang, capital of Communist North Korea, and Sinmak. Their aircraft were equipped with under-wing rocket projectiles, just as the Hawker Typhoon had been during World War II. Indeed, the Meteor – although now outclassed as a high altitude interceptor – was still a deadly weapon platform in the ground attack role, as the Israeli Air Force was to prove during the Suez Crisis three years later.

Back in Korea though, upon reaching Pyongyang the formation split with Hale and Irlam heading south in line astern at low level. Hale sighted three transonic swept-wing MiG 15 fighters preparing to attack two USAF RF-80 Shooting Stars. As he jettisoned his ventral tank and turned to intercept the MiGs, Hale fired off the last two of his underwing rockets in an attempt to distract the enemy pilots. This forced the two MiGs to turn away from each other.

As he turned to follow the enemy, Irlam reported that he was under fire and Hale turned into the new threat, which turned out to be two MiGs on Irlam's tail. While Irlam headed for cloud cover in his damaged Meteor, Hale's opponent extended his air brakes and turned in behind Irlam, but overshot. Hale extended his air brakes and slotted in behind the MiG. He opened fire and hit the enemy fighter squarely behind the cockpit. The MiG rolled on its back and fell away, spewing smoke. Just as Hale was about to follow his victim, two more MiGs dived on him. However, he managed to pulled into them and fired but their speed carried them away. A third pair of Communist jets turned in on his tail but Hale turned back on them and opened fire on the second MiG, which left a trail of white smoke. Out of ammunition, Hale had to let the MiGs get away.

Back at Kimpo, Hale and his wingman counted no fewer than 112 shrapnel holes in Irlam's Meteor.

Frog/Novo kit from the Jet Age Reserve Model Collection

To replace the Meteor Night Fighters in RAF service, Gloster managed to overcome competition from the de Havilland DH110 ( later to evolve into the Sea Vixen naval fighter ) and build the delta winged Javelin.

The Gloster Javelin was designed to Air Ministry Specification F4/48 and was selected to equip the RAF's all-weather squadrons in 1952. It was the world's first delta winged fighter and could intercept high flying bombers day or night and in all weathers because of its electronic and radar instrumentation. The first prototype flew in 1951 from Moreton Valence, just south of Gloucester, and it entered service with the RAF in 1956 with No 46 squadron at Odiham in Hampshire.

Nine variants of the Javelin were produced, steadily increasing its performance and allowing it take on different roles. The Fighter All Weather 7 version introduced Firestreak homing air-to-air missile armament in addition to 30 mm Aden cannon. Also noticeable was an extended rear fuselage – bringing the twin Sapphire jet pipes beyond the fin – and wing mounted vortex generators. The FAW 8 held the unhappy distinction of being the last aircraft to be manufactured by the Gloster Aircraft Company although it continued with aircraft modification and repair for a number of years.

The FAW 9 was in fact a major update of the FAW 7, 116 of which were modified at Gloucester in the early 1960's. Over 400 Javellns were built for the RAF and at peak strength the type equipped 18 different squadrons, namely numbers 3, 5, 11, 23, 25, 29, 33, 41, 46, 60, 64, 72, 85, 87, 89, 96, 141 and 151.

The disbandment of No 60 squadron RAF in 1968 saw the end of the Javelin's service in the front line.

XH 766 is seen here as a 9R variant, further distinguished by its refuelling boom, and wears the scarab and trellis markings of 64 Squadron. This unit had previously flown Meteors F8, NF12 and NF 14, converting to Javelins in 1958 and moving to Binbrook in 1961. It later served as all-weather air defence for Indonesia – based at Tengah – until disbandment on 16 June 1967.


GLOSTER METEOR

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies’ first operational jet. It first flew in 1943 and commenced operations in 1944 with 616 Squadron of the RAF. It was not an aerodynamically advanced aircraft, and suffered problems with transonic stability typical of such early jets. Nevertheless it was an effective jet fighter that served the RAF and other air forces for decades.

The aircraft served an integral role in the development of the ejection seat and two Meteors, WL419 and WA638, remained in service with the Martin-Baker company for many years after retirement from RAF service as ejection seat test-beds. Production of the Meteor continued until 1954 with almost 3,900 made, mainly the F 8 variant.

We offer three titles for the Gloster Meteor, covering flight manuals (called pilot’s notes) for most models of the Meteor in RAF service, plus two manufacturer’s publications. Each title is US$9.95. Each file has been scanned from the original flight manuals and retains any colour pages.


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1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by AndrewDoppel » Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:58 pm

By far the second worse kit I've ever built with fit issues, poor instructions and short shot mouldings

Serial: A77-3 (WM262)
Type: Gloster Meteor NF.11
Based: ARDU - Air Trials Flight, Mallala, SA. (Circa 1955)
Scheme: All over white with black anti-glare panel
History: Sole NF.11 taken on charge by the RAAF. 4.09.53 Assembly commenced at 1AD and allocated serial A77-3. Allocated to ARDU Trials Flight (ATF) to be used for Blue Boar Missile trials. Crashed on take off Mallala 19/9/55. Aircraft destroyed by fire. Pilot Flt Lt Ross M Frayne killed.
Kit: Matchbox 1/72 NF.11 Meteor (OOB) Decals-home-made, kit and spares
References: Stewart Wilson's Meteor, Sabre and Mirage in Australian Service, ADF Serials

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by qfa_tsv » Mon Mar 12, 2018 8:31 am

I have a couple of those kits in the stash, you're putting me off building them

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by DesTROYer » Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:00 am

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by Brenden S » Mon Mar 12, 2018 5:35 pm

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by rodenlee » Mon Mar 12, 2018 5:47 pm

Lovely job Andrew, she's come up a treat.

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by AndrewDoppel » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:45 pm

qfa_tsv wrote: Nice result the Andrew

I have a couple of those kits in the stash, you're putting me off building them

Do yourself a favour. don't!

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by AndrewDoppel » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:46 pm

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by Zaggy » Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:38 am

Nice one Andrew - one of my favourite RAAF jets.

Tell me, what did you end up doing on the lower surfaces? The Pics I have seen of -3 seem to suggest no lower Roundels, but a profile that comes with a Research Article I have, does show Roundels under the wings I'm still in two minds about my 1/48 one.

Re: 1/72 NF.11 Gloster Meteor A77-3

by AndrewDoppel » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:46 pm

If you look at the attached image you can clearly see no underside roundels and the black calibration line on the lower side of the intakes.

I'd be going by this rather than the research article if you're going to do it in A77-3 markings. I say this not having seen any images of the aircraft in British serials as it may have had the under wing roundels reapplied however, I would've thought RAF codes would've gone on the undersides.

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グロスター ミーティア (Gloster Meteor)

高速化目的で単発を主張する空軍省に対し、エンジンの低信頼性を憂慮する同社主任技師のジョージ・カーター(George Carter)は双発を主張して譲らず、結局双発で計画は進められた。
機体自体は革新性皆無の極めて凡庸なもので、早くも1942年春には8機の試作が開始されたものの、搭載予定エンジン W.2 を巡る混乱で計画は大きく遅延し、先に実用化したハルフォード H.1(後のデ・ハビランド ゴブリン)を仮に積んで、1943年3月にようやく初飛行した。

当初「サンダーボルト」と命名予定だったが、アメリカ陸軍航空隊の リパブリック P-47 との競合を避けるため、程なく「ミーティア」に改称された。テイル・ヘビー傾向とヨー安定不良が深刻でスピン癖が強かったが、各種試験を続行し小改良で実用化の目処を立てた。量産試作型 F.1 の原型機は、米英定期技術交流でベル P-59 と交換されている。

ウェランド搭載のミーティア F.1 と、スピットファイア Mk.VII からなる混成評価飛行隊(616th sq.)の編成は1944年7月12日で、8月4日にはV1飛行爆弾を主翼同士を接触、反転させて初撃墜を記録し、その後も14発ばかりの戦果を上げたが、上昇力に劣り、加減速が緩慢で姿勢制御が難しく、またウェランドの軸受強度から機動は± 2G 程度に制限されていたため、この段階で対戦闘機戦闘は事実上不可能だった。Me262 とは異なり、F.1 はただ連合国側初のジェット機という存在価値しかなく、高度に発達したレシプロ戦闘機に優る点はあまりなかった。

ダーウェント Mk.I 搭載の本格量産型 F.3 は同年12月から配備が開始され、1飛行中隊がベルギーにも展開したが、この頃既にドイツ側の反撃は少なくなっており、想定された Me262 との交戦機会もなく、専ら対地攻撃機として試験運用されるうちに終戦を迎えた。

1944年末に遠心式ターボジェットの決定版ロールス・ロイス ニーンが完成すると、直ぐさまそのミーティア向けの縮小版ダーウェント Mk.V が計画された。この専用エンジンを搭載した F.4 は1945年5月に初飛行し、パワーアップに空力的洗練も相俟って Me262 に比肩し得る性能を発揮したものの、同時期にアメリカで実用化したロッキード P80 と同様、時既に遅く第2次世界大戦には間に合わなかった。

この F.4 と、与圧コックピットと西側初の射出座席を装備した全面改良型 F.8 はイギリス連邦以外の友好諸国への売り込みにも成功し、複座練習機型も含めて多くが輸出された。F.4 の内2機はスピードレーサーに改造され、1945年11月7日に初めて600 mph(970 km/h)を突破したが、未公認に終わった。またロールス・ロイス トレントに換装された F.3 の1機は、世界初のターボプロップ推進機として各種試験を行い、後のダート開発に大きく貢献した。

1946年から1952年にかけてミーティア113機を調達したオーストラリア空軍は、岩国基地所属の第77編隊を1951年7月にノースアメリカン F-51D からミーティア F.8 に転換して金浦基地に転出、朝鮮戦争の前線に投入した。同年8月29日、圧倒的に高性能な新鋭機 MiG-15 との初交戦では1機を喪失2機を大破され戦果なく、北側空軍が練度を上げるに従って更に損害が増し、12月1日のミーティア12機とミグ40機の遭遇では1機の初撃墜を記録したものの逆に4機を失ったため、以降は制空任務をノースアメリカン F-86 に譲り対地攻撃と低空写真偵察に専念した。期間を通じて少なくとも30機のミーティアが敵側戦闘機により撃墜されたが、対空砲火による被害はそれ以上に登る。